Call of the Killer Whale

The most complex marine species on the planet, our counterparts in the sea, are the orca, the ruler of the ocean. They are the most widely distributed marine mammal in the world. Their realm extends from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Orcas, also called killer whales, number fewer than 100,000 worldwide, and learning more about them is a global endeavor for Jean-Michel Cousteau and his team of explorers, who travel to both the northern and southern hemispheres as they seek out killer whales in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Svolvaer

An aerial of Svolvaer, Norway. Most years Orca gather here to feed on herring. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Andenes

An orca surfaces in Andenes, Norway. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Elusive

The elusive Norwegian Orca approach the team's boat. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Andenes

An orca surfaces in Andenes, Norway. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Cheers

The team is excited to find "Rakey" in the Auckalnd harbor the next afternoon. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Brief Encounter

After weeks of looking for Orca in Norway, the team was finally rewarded with a brief encounter with a pod of orca. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Andenes

An orca surfaces in Andenes, Norway. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Takapuna Harbor

Hundred's of well wishers gathered at the harbor for "Rakey's" release. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Release

Dr. Ingrid Visser, Jean-Michel Cousteau and Holly Lohuis offer boat support during the release. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Vitals

Dr. Ingrid Visser takes "Rakey's" vitals in preparation for her long journey to where she will be released the following morning. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

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