Return to the Amazon

Manioc

MANIOC: Even at midday the windowless maloca is dark. Here, as a little girl keeps her company, a Marubo woman stirs boiling manioc, often called cassava. The process removes the toxin in the root. (Manioc starch is the source of tapioca.) © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Maloca

MALOCA: A young Marubo girl rocks a baby boy in one of the maloca’s several hammocks. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society

Marubo

MARUBO: The lower face and neck of this young woman of the Marubo tribe are painted with a dye derived from the fruit of a tropical evergreen tree (Genipa americana) to which ashes and coal have been added. The body markings, which last for about two weeks, identify her clan affiliation. Since there are outsiders in the village, she is wearing a bra. Her necklace consists of layers of snail shell while her blue earrings were not made locally. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Cattle Ranching

CATTLE RANCHING: Cowboy herding Nelore cattle. The breed has its origins in cattle originally from India. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Miracle Tree

MIRACLE TREE: Moss grows on a tree at the Jari Sustainable Forest Stewardship Project. Each tree is tagged with its own number. In the central database can be found information, including species and age, concerning any particular tree. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Hearts of Gold

HEARTS OF GOLD: Gold capped teeth are popular among the Shipibo people of the Amazon. Nevertheless, this young man’s pair with their upside-down-heart-shaped inserts are unique. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Heavy Lifting

HEAVY LIFTING: Fishermen at the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve pull in pirarucu. And, in grappling with the huge fish, sometimes they themselves get pulled into the drink! © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Ellen

ELLEN: Village girl, Ellen Rodrigues Carvalho, also takes a shine to the photographer. Although used to the presence of tourists who come to visit and buy local crafts, the children seem fascinated by Vonderhaar’s camera equipment, and, most likely, her golden locks. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Migration

MIGRATION: This small waterfall is one of the hurdles fish have to overcome in their migration. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Ominous Cloud

OMINOUS CLOUD: A pillar of smoke reaches towards the sky as yet another section of the Amazon near Manaus burns. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society

Syndicate content