Sea Ghosts

Bird's Eye View

Belugas are highly sociable creatures. Groups of males may number in the hundreds, but mothers with calves generally mix in slightly smaller groups. Here Belugas congregate in the St. Lawrence River, Canada. © Aron Bosworth, Ocean Futures Society

Beluga Pods

Pods of Belugas gather in the St. Lawrence River, Canada. © Aron Bosworth, Ocean Futures Society

Polar Bear Family

A mother polar bear and her two cubs cross the pack ice near Baffin Island, Canada. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Spyhop

A curious beluga whale 'spyhops' to gain a better view of the Ocean Futures Expedition Team. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Beluga Cow and Calf

A Beluga cow and calf. Calfs remain grey in color until they reach adulthood. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Beluga

The Beluga Whale is commonly referred to simply as the Sea Canary due to its high-pitched twitter. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Beluga Pod

Belugas also gather in the Cunningham Inlet to rub their bodies on the cobblestone substrate which aids in sloughing off dead skin. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Beluga Pod

Beluga Whales come to Somerset Island, Canda every year to rub in the "warmer" shallows of Cunningham Inlet. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Tail

Beluga Whale Fluke. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Beluga

The head is also unlike that of any other cetacean - its melon is extremely bulbous and even malleable. The beluga is able to change the shape of its head by blowing air around its sinuses. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

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