Sea Ghosts

Expeditions:Sea Ghosts Gallery

The Ocean Futures Society Team traveled across the arctic on expedition for Sea Ghosts. Please click on the thumbnails to begin the slide show and be sure to visit both galleries!

The head is also unlike that of any other cetacean - its melon is extremely bulbous and even malleable. The beluga is able to change the shape of its head by blowing air around its sinuses. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Beluga Whales come to Somerset Island, Canda every year to rub in the "warmer" shallows of Cunningham Inlet. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Beluga Whale Fluke. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

The Beluga Whale is commonly referred to simply as the Sea Canary due to its high-pitched twitter. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Belugas also gather in the Cunningham Inlet to rub their bodies on the cobblestone substrate which aids in sloughing off dead skin. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

A Beluga cow and calf. Calfs remain grey in color until they reach adulthood. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

A curious beluga whale 'spyhops' to gain a better view of the Ocean Futures Expedition Team. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Belugas are highly sociable creatures. Groups of males may number in the hundreds, but mothers with calves generally mix in slightly smaller groups. Here Belugas congregate in the St. Lawrence River, Canada. © Aron Bosworth, Ocean Futures Society

Pods of Belugas gather in the St. Lawrence River, Canada. © Aron Bosworth, Ocean Futures Society

A mother polar bear and her two cubs cross the pack ice near Baffin Island, Canada. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

A juvenile polar bear near Baffin Island, Canada. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

A juvenile polar bear approaches the film crew. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

© Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Polar bears are marine mammals who are at ease in the water. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Choosing between two icebergs is a difficult decision. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

© Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

The arctic fox changes its color depending on the Acrtic seasons. In the winter it is white to blend in with the snow, while in the summer months its fur changes to brown. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Play time at the arctic fox den. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

The arctic fox will generally eat any meat it can find, including lemmings, Arctic hare, reptiles and amphibians, eggs, and carrion. Lemmings are the most common prey. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

When its normal prey is scare, the Arctic Fox scavenges the leftovers of larger predators, such as the polar bear, even though the bears' prey includes the Artic Fox itself. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED