Return to the Amazon

Embers

EMBERS: Embers glow at the base of a decimated, ash-covered tree. Photographing the scene, Carrie Vonderhaar’s rubber-soled shoes begin to soften from the intense heat of the ground. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Point of Comparison

POINT OF COMPARISON: Just how far the river rose during high-water season is made graphically clear by the line separating the darker-toned, water-saturated bark from the lighter-toned section that remained above the water line. Céline Cousteau stands at the base of the tree. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Great Egret

GREAT EGRET: A Great Egret (Ardea alba) swallows a sábalo cola roja (Brycon cephalus) whole. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Long Day

LONG DAY: A spider's work is never done. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Voracious Predator

VORACIOUS PREDATOR: The tiger beetle, a type of carabid beetle, has bulging eyes, runs fast and is a formidable hunter. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Hand-to-Mouth Existence

HAND-TO-MOUTH EXISTENCE: Squirrel monkeys are insectivorous. They are also highly social, living in groups of up to 500 individuals. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Zecke

ZECKE: Zecke, a pensive-looking monk saki (Pithecia monachus), was adopted in 2002 by Gudrun Sperrer, owner of the Pilpintuwasi Butterfly Farm and Amazon Animal Orphanage in Iquitos. Monk sakis, found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, are diurnal tree dwellers. Monogamous pairs breed for life and live in nuclear families; however, at night, several families may sleep in the same tree. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Junior

JUNIOR: Although he broke camera equipment and was prone to giving friendly nips to everybody, "Junior" was the team’s hands down favourite. Here, he "instructs" Matt Ferraro in the proper use of a Sony HDW-F900/3 high-definition camera. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Chavo and Holly

CHAVO AND HOLLY: "Chavo," an adult uakari monkey, was brought to the orphanage several years ago. He had a bullet wound in the chest and a broken ankle. At Pilpintuwasi, he is very protective of the other monkeys. Chavo has a particularly strong attachment to OFS marine biologist Holly Lohuis. © Richard Murphy, Ocean Futures Society

You Scratch My Back; I’ll Scratch Yours

YOU SCRATCH MY BACK; I'LL SCRATCH YOURS: Now it’s Chavo’s turn for the spa treatment. Holly happily returns the favour to her favourite resident of Pilpintuwasi. © Richard Murphy Ocean Futures Society

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