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Anaconda

ANACONDA: Richard Murphy keeps a respectful distance as an anaconda glides effortlessly through the water. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Close up

CLOSE UP: Richard Murphy takes a close look at an anaconda that has wrapped itself around a submerged tree trunk. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Underwater Turtle

UNDERWATER TURTLE: A turtle, as seen from below, swims at the surface of the water. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Stingray

STINGRAY: Céline Cousteau cautiously approaches a freshwater stingray. Its eye is left of centre. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Toad

TOAD: The South American Common Toad (Rhinella margaritifera) is typically diurnal. At night, it sleeps on leaves or branches. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Hoatzins

HOATZINS: The chicken-sized hoatzin (pronounced "Watson") is striking with its beady red eyes and blue "eyeliner. " However, this exotic bird is sometimes called "stink bird" because of its manure-like odour. Unlike most other plant-eating birds, the hoatzin boasts a cow-like gut which allows it to digest much of the plant fibre in its diet. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Let’s See Who Blinks First

LET'S SEE WHO BLINKS FIRST: After a L-O-N-G stare-down, this female sloth continued on its unhurried way. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Dancer

DANCER: Accompanied by drummers, local villagers in colourful costume perform at the hotel and dazzle its guests with their agility. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Titi Monkey

TITI MONKEY: Despite the pouring rain, this dusky titi monkey (Callicebus moloch) seemed just as fascinated by the photographer as she was by him. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

Sweet « Gremlin » of Mindú Park

SWEET « GREMLIN » OF MINDÚ PARK: The embattled pied bare-faced tamarin is the mascot of the city of Manaus. At Christmas time, the inhabitants of the jungle metropolis show their affection for the diminutive monkey by decorating the streets with plastic statues of tamarins alongside more traditional decorations featuring Santa Claus or the Wise Men. © Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society/KQED

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